Evil Ed

Original Poster

Release Date: May 2, 1997 (Sweden)

Genre: Horror, Comedy

Director: Anders Jacobsson   

Writers: Anders Jacobsson , Göran Lundström, Christer Ohlsson

Starring: Johan Rudebeck, Olof Rhodin, Camela Leierth, Per Lofberg

WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS IN THIS REVIEW

When I think of countries that have produced horror films, the most notable ones that come up besides the United States are Japan and Italy. There are so many notable films in the horror genre that birthed from these countries. Of course, that’s not to say that foreign horror films are limited to these countries. There have been films shot in Spain (1982’s Pieces), Australia (2005’s Wolf Creek) and Romania (Subspecies movies from the 90s) just to name a few. A couple years ago when I was getting back into the world of exploitation films thanks to the hit Shudder series “The Last Drive In” featuring my all-time favorite critic, Joe Bob Briggs I was looking for titles that were lesser known, but had a cult following. One of those movies I discovered through the streaming app Tubi was a 1997 Swedish slasher film which premise caught my attention. Within the first viewing I was hooked on it and ended up buying the Blu-Ray Collector’s Edition which featured three versions of the film. That film which is this week’s “Guilty Pleasure Cinema” review is Evil Ed!

Directed by Anders Jacobsson, who also wrote the script with Göran Lundström and Christer Ohlsson, Evil Ed stars Johan Rudebeck as Edward ‘Eddie’ Tor Swenson, an editor for the film company European Distributors, who gets assigned to the “Splatter & Gore Department,” which is the horror movie line to complete the unfinished edits of the company’s biggest franchise, the Loose Limbs films. The head of the department Sam Campbell (Olof Rhodin) allows Eddie to use his private cottage in the Swedish countryside to complete the films. Alone in the cottage and viewing these films for the first time Eddie is exposed to the blood, gore, violence, and craziness of the series as he has never seen a horror film in his life. Working late hours and watching every entry to edit them due to each European country’s different censor laws, Eddie develops hallucinations and sees anyone checking up on him as a monster to the point where he develops insanity and kills them.

Johan Rudebeck as protagonist Edward ‘Eddie’ Tor Swenson

The writers of Evil Ed created this movie as a political statement to the harsh censorship laws of Sweden. At the time, the country did not allow films to feature blood, gore, sex, or excessive violence. Eventually the country eased up on their restrictions which allowed Anders Jacobsson to proceed with making of this film. The film took five years to finish. It’s original intention was to be a short film, but ended up turning into a full length feature. The production went through some troubled times. The film was made using discarded equipment and there were constant re-shoots in order to get it to look the way it ends up on the film. When it was finished, Evil Ed was shown in only four theaters in Sweden. However, the great reviews of the movie created a buzz and ended up selling the distribution to over sixty countries.

There is so much I enjoyed about Evil Ed. The first thing I praise is its originality. I’ve never seen a film up to that point about a film editor who goes completely mad while performing his job. When you think about it, film editing is just a typical job. It can get frustrating, and you must work long hours in order to get the cut that the Director wants. It’s his vision, after all. The character of Eddie reminds us of ourselves as how we would react to something that we see for the first time and don’t know how to compute it. This could be anything from seeing your first horror movie to perhaps seeing a naked body for the first time and not knowing how to process it in your brain or you watch something traumatic that you don’t know how to react, and stays bottled up with you inside. Jacobsson does a great job exploring these feelings throughout the lead character which in turn is performed great by Johan Rudebeck. You see how innocent and mild mannered he is and then you slowly watch as his morality and clean soul is polluted by what he sees on the monitor. Rudebeck’s Eddie goes through the moods like changes of the season. He goes from innocent to scared to humorous in a dark tone to outright madness which doesn’t end well.

Image of the Loose Limb killer

There’s not much of a supporting cast other than the principal actors. I found Olof Rhodin’s portrayal of Sam Campbell to be hilarious and he acts just how an executive would act. He doesn’t care about the concerns Eddie brings up to him. All he cares about is the job getting done so his distribution deal can be signed and delivered. That’s the name of the game in the film industry. The art aspect is gone, and films are seen as products being sold to the highest bidder. Before I go any further into the performances I should point out since that the film is Swedesh, the characters were dubbed by English speaking actors. The dubbed actors played it straight. You don’t have to worry about it being too goofy or over the top with the exception of some of the monsters that Eddie sees when he takes his periodic breaks in between his editing jobs.

Evil Ed has the right balance of horror and comedy not to take it too seriously. Each scene fits appropriately to the situation that is unfolding. Many fan reviews compare the humor and horror to that of the Evil Dead movies. That’s a fair statement to make. I found myself laughing at the littlest moments. The ample amount of blood and gore is right on the level of Evil Dead and will keep not only those fans, but gore fans hungry for more. It didn’t occur to me until I started doing research on this movie is that the filmmakers were obviously influenced by Sam Raimi’s classic horror trilogy and the character name of Sam Campbell didn’t resonate in my head until I realized he took Sam Raimi’s first name and Bruce Campbell’s last name. I can be naive to those minute details.

Eddie’s Descent Into Madness

I loved the cinematography of the film. Evil Ed was shot in 16MM and most of the film takes place at night with a cold blue light that surrounds the scenes to give it a very eerie tone. The makeup effects for the characters were top notch with a few frightening moments including a hag looking monster who screams at Eddie, which happens to be my favorite part in the movie (I have an Audio Clip as proof). There’s even a scene where the monster is reminiscent of Tim Curry’s Darkness character from Ridley Scott’s Legend. The short clips shown of the Loose Limbs films are full of blood and slapstick as an homage to the popular slasher films of the 80s.

The only gripe I really have about the movie is the pacing and the third act. Things start to slow down during the third act and get very silly. I won’t go into too many details to avoid spoilers, but I felt that the writers could’ve taken the time to finish the story in a different way. My impressions from the final act was that they were struggling to come up with a satisfactory ending so they decided to rush one through with something common. It tarnishes from the rest of the film’s originality.

Evil Ed is a fun and frightening flick that is great to watch on a Friday or Saturday evening. It falls in the category of my favorite underrated and underappreciated horror films. Evil Ed put Sweden on the horror movie map. I’ll need to I would love to see it get “The Last Drive In” treatment someday. This is the perfect movie to watch with your friends while Joe Bob provides insightful information about the movie and what the actors, writers and filmmakers are doing these days. I’m not sure if it’s available to watch on Tubi, but if it is definitely reserve a night to watch and if you like it, pick up the Collector’s Edition which features the Director’s Cut.

TRIVIA (Per IMDB)

  • It took five years to make this movie which started as a short film project. All the trailers and “films-in-the-film”-scenes was the first sequences to be filmed.
  • The title is an obvious play on The Evil Dead (1981). The character name Sam Campbell is another reference to that movie: the director of The Evil Dead (1981) is Sam Raimi, and the star is Bruce Campbell.
  • Only four theaters in Sweden wanted to see this film. It was later sold to over 60 countries.
  • All the dubbed voices were performed by American actors at Bandit Radio, an English-speaking radio station in Stockholm.
  • Although his part is unspecified in the credits, Bill Moseley provides the voice for the killer in the “Loose Limbs” films.
  • When Ed throws the head of the crackhead out of the window, it bounces off the hood of a car. The man driving the car is Director Anders Jacobsson.
  • The movie originally ended with Barbara shooting Edward and him being taken away to hospital. Then the camera goes into the house and up the stairs into Edward’s editing room. The shot ends with a zoom into the editing screen as we see the trailer to “Loose Limbs 8”. The filmmakers realized that the movie was too short and wasn’t exciting enough. So a new ending had to be shot.
  • When it was completed, the filmmakers changed the the camera used in the film was an archived 16mm camera owned by Sveriges Television, the Swedish state TV-station. The producers acquired the camera from an elderly janitor for a bottle of whiskey.

AUDIO CLIPS

I’m Just Another Chunk of Meat
So This Is The Splatter & Gore Department?
You Keep Them Heads Rolling
Do You Like What You See Darling?
What I Need Is Results
Don’t You Look At Me
I Think I Maybe Should Go To A Hospital
Do You Call That A Great Movie?
Don’t Thank Me, Thank Science
Close The Door You Nazi
Answer A Simple Question
Coffee?
Good Night
This Is Dying Time
I’m Coming To Get You Barbara
Is This The Police?
You Can Remove The Jacket
I Told The Doctor Someone’s After Me
Nice Tie

The Great White Hype

Official Poster

Release Date: May 3, 1996

Genre: Comedy, Sport

Director: Reginald Hudlin   

Writers: Tonya Hendra, Ron Shelton

Starring: Damon Wayans, Samuel L. Jackson, Jeff Goldblum, Peter Berg, Corbin Bernsen, Jon Lovitz

WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS IN THIS REVIEW

Hello readers! Welcome to another review on “Guilty Pleasure Cinema!” This week’s review is a real treat. The movie I’m presenting is one I’ve been wanting to post for over a year. Every time I get around to start working on it, I would get delayed by life….you know how that goes. I’m on vacation from my regular day job as I’m typing up this review and I told myself, “No more excuses, get it done!” For this week’s review I decided to do a sporting themed movie, which I don’t believe I’ve done yet (feel free to call me out if I do). It’s a Boxing themed movie that mixers comedy and satire into one overlooked film that I completely forgot about until it was available to watch on HBO Go, the original HBO streaming service before they changed to HBO Max. Featuring a ensemble cast of recognizable faces including those who would become future stars in their own right, this week we’re looking at 1996’s The Great White Hype!

The Great White Hype stars Samuel L. Jackson as Boxing promoter Reverend Fred Sultan, who represents the undefeated Heavyweight Champion James “Grim Reaper” Roper (Damon Wayans). After Roper’s latest victory, Sultan reveals that the fight was a financial flop and interest in the sport is declining. He theorizes that audiences are sick and tired of watching only black boxers beat each other up. Sultan comes up with a way to reenergize the sport and generate a huge payday for everyone by having Roper go up against a white contender citing the 1982 fight between Larry Holmes and Gerry Cooney. After some research, they track down the only white man whom had defeated Roper at the Amateur level, Terry Conklin (Peter Berg). Conklin lives in Cleveland and is now in a rock band. After being approached at an after party at one of his gigs, Sultan offers Conklin a chance to return to the ring for a hefty sum. Conklin refuses stating he’s more interested in his band and fighting social issues than fighting people. Sultan uses his charm and manipulation to convince Conklin that he could use the money to eradicate homelessness which is Conklin’s main priority. Conklin agrees. Sultan uses his power and influence to get Conklin into the Top Ten rankings and the fight between him and Roper is on with Conklin training hard and Roper hardly training.

Samuel L. Jackson’s Fred Sultan Introducing Peter Berg’s Terry Conklin to the Press

In addition to the names above the film also stars Jeff Goldblum as investigative television journalist Mitchell Kane who has gathered evidence to show how unethical and corrupt the Sultan is only to sell out and join Sultan’s team, Corbin Bernsen as Peter Prince, owner of the MGM Grand, Jon Lovitz as Sol, who is Sultan’s PR guy, Cheech Marin as Julio Escobar, commissioner of the Nevada Boxing Committee, Michael Jace as Marvin Shabazz, who is the number one contender to face Roper only to be passed over for Conklin and Jamie Foxx in an early role as Hassan El Ruk’n, Shabazz’s manager. The film features guest appearances from longtime Boxing writer Bert Sugar, Brian Setzer doing a musical number and Method Man.

As mentioned in the opening paragraph, The Great White Hype is a satirical Boxing film taking influence from not only Rocky but the title is based on the Larry Holmes vs. Gerry Cooney fight of 1982 where Cooney is dubbed, “The Great White Hope.” That term has been used by Boxing to recognize up and coming white heavyweight Boxers who have the potential of being great. One name that sticks out to me is the late Tommy Morrison, who was the last known great white heavyweight boxer from the 90s until his career shockingly ended due to him testing positive for HIV (one of Morrison’s fights is shown in the film when Sultan’s crew is researching white Boxers).  

Jeff Goldblum as Investigative Journalist Mitchell Kane

The Great White Hype is a simple story with very little twists and shocking moments. It’s about one match, the Main Event. Within that one match, director Reginald Hudlin showcases the political nature of the Boxing world. Each character declares a form of morality which only a mask for them wanting to achieve their hidden goals dealing with power, money, influence, and greed all together. Jackon’s Sultan is like Don King, who is only looking after his interests and raking as much money for him from his prized fighter. Wayans’ Roper is yearning for the respect and the cash he desperately wants, being sick and tired of having his fight winnings in the form of one new Rolls Royce after another. Berg’s Conklin has his ethics and principles contradicted through being in the media spotlight and being adored by many despite the fact no one knows who he is and Goldblum’s Kane sells out his journalistic integrity to be part of a bigger click. The casting is perfectly fitted to the characters. My favorite performances were Jackson, Wayans, Berg, Goldblum and Jon Lovitz. Jackson’s loud and eccentricity glows through the film. Wayans his hilarious as Roper who gets cocky and lazy with his training that he shows up to the fight overweight complete with a huge belly. Berg’s Conklin is dimwitted who you feel during the movie that his heart is not wanting to get back into the ring. Goldblum is Goldblum and Lovitz is Lovitz who provides some great liners with the zest and snap that Lovitz is known for. I do however feel that there should have been more screen time with Michael Jace and Jamie Foxx. They only appear during each press conference pleading their case to get a title shot and one scene where they confront Sultan and his posse in his own penthouse.

I enjoyed the pacing of the film and gave some great insights as to how Roper and Conklin were preparing for their fight. Conklin is training hard but is also spending a lot of time in photo shoots and interviews where he gets contradicted on comments he was saying. Wayans’ training routine (or lack thereof) were some great laugh out loud moments. The dialogue has its cheesy moments most notably from the supporting cast. I especially enjoyed the commentary from Boxing writer Bert Sugar and the announcers of the fight who are in disbelief over both fighters.

The Main Event

Boxing is one of the few sports that seems to translate well in a film adaptation and The Great White Hype is one of those films. It is a funny and sharp satirical film that will keep you laughing through it’s near 90-minute runtime. I’m surprised this film doesn’t get mentioned when people talk about their favorite Sports films or Boxing films. Yes, it doesn’t take itself seriously like a Rocky or Raging Bull, but it’s a fresh funny take on the sport and everything that goes on behind the scenes. If you’re lucky to find it on a streaming site or if you have to pay to rent it, then do it. The Great White Hype is another in a long line of underrated films to come from the 90s.

TRIVIA (Per IMDB)

  • Reverend Fred Sultan (Samuel L. Jackson) greets a man with shoulder length black hair and a black suit, with “Hey Vincent, Vincent, where’s Jules man?”, a reference to Jackson’s character in Pulp Fiction (1994).
  • Sol (Jon Lovitz) mentions, when watching the film of Tommy Morrison being knocked out, that he is “John Wayne’s cousin”. Morrison was John Wayne’s (real name Marion Michael Morrison) grand-nephew.
  • Many members of the cast made either guest appearances or had recurring roles on the FOX television series Roc (1991), which featured Rocky Carroll as a regular cast member. This includes Samuel L. Jackson, Corbin Bernsen, Salli Richardson-Whitfield, Jamie Foxx, Albert Hall, Lamont Johnson, Art Evans, and Rick Scarry.
  • Ron Shelton has expressed distaste for the film, because his script was completely revised by comedian Tony Hendra.
  • Such was Ron Shelton’s dislike of this movie that he has said, “I tried to get my name taken off it, because the film they made was not the script I wrote. I find it a horrible movie.”
  • Jason Flemyng auditioned for the role of Conklin. Asked to strip to the waist and shadowbox, he sneezed because of the cold and smeared the snot over himself to keep in character, much to the cameraman’s disgust.

AUDIO CLIPS

I’m An Artist
I’ll Spank You
That’s The Third I Love You
I Drive A Brougham
You’ve Got A Whole Bunch of Guns
Who Beat Roper As An Amateur?
I Don’t Need My Ego Fed
I Give My Money To The Homeless
The Announcement
Kid’s Not Even A Professional
Cannot Make Caviar Out of Fish Eggs
I Can Beat Conklin and My Meat At The Same Time
How Do You Like Las Vegas?
Donations
Roper At The Weigh In
Never Met A Meal He Didn’t Like