Sleepaway Camp

Official Poster

Release Date: November 18, 1983

Genre: Horror

Director: Robert Hiltzik

Writer: Robert Hiltzik

Starring: Felissa Rose, Jonathan Tiersten, Karen Fields, Christopher Collet, Mike Kellin

WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS IN THIS REVIEW

Note: This review was originally posted in October 2018 on my previous blog “Guilty Pleasure Cinema Review.”

This “Guilty Pleasure Cinema” review is one of the more controversial underground horror movies to come out of this list. This movie came out in 1983, but I wasn’t aware of the film until about 2014. It was this past summer where I watched it for the first time at a local discount theater where they were playing “Summer Themed” horror movies. It’s a movie like the previous two films in the special where I’ve watched repeatedly and enjoyed it on so many levels. The next film on this list is the summer camp slasher film Sleepaway Camp!

Sleepaway Camp is the story of two cousins, Rickey and Angela who are about to spend their summer at Camp Arawak. Rickey is a seasoned veteran at the camp while this will be Angela’s first time. Angela is quiet and shy. She is also suffering from a post traumatic event involving her father and brother being killed in a boating accident. Angela is disliked by the other campers for obvious reasons and only seems to talk to Rickey. She does strike up a conversation with Rickey’s friend Paul and become close throughout the movie. As the summer camp begins its annual season, a series of murders start to happen that has everyone on edge. Who is committing these murders and what is the motive?

Jonathan Tiersten and Felissa Rose as Rickey and Angela in “Sleepaway Camp.”

Sleepaway Camp was a surprise hit at the box office. It grossed over $11 million dollars with a reported $300,000 budget. It has a huge following and Felissa Rose became a member of the “Scream Queen Sorority”. The movie is known for its infamous and controversial ending that still shocks the viewing audience today (It sure did shock me). People like to debate which was the better slasher film, this or Friday the 13th.

Right off the bat, Sleepaway Camp gets your emotions charged. You see the traumatic event that will shape the story and the character of Angela throughout the film. When you see Felissa Rose appear on screen for the first time she is quiet and reserved. She barely makes eye contact with her aunt and stays close to her cousin Rickey. The camp counselors (well…most of them) are aware that this is the first time Angela will be away from home and they give her sympathy and comfort to make sure she enjoys her time. Her unwillingness to socialize with her roommates nor participate in any camp activities draws the ire of Judy (Karen Fields), the supposed popular girl at the camp and Meg (Katherine Kamhi). Rose gives a cold frightening performance with her constant stare downs. It’s a very intimidating look although the rest of the counselors don’t feel intimidated by her. She doesn’t utter her first words until she is confronted by Paul, Rickey’s fried who attempts to engage in conversation with her. From there you see her shyness melt away as she spends more time with Paul.

Susan Glaze and Paul DeAngelo as the horrified counselors in “Sleepaway Camp.”

Besides Rose’s iconic performance, the other performances were good. Each actor and actress played their character as they were written. Jonathan Tiersten’s performance as Rickey was hilarious. He loves to stir up trouble through his trash talking and constant profanity. He does a great job protecting Angela. He’s like a big brother to her rather than a cousin. My other favorite performance is the camp owner, Mel played by veteran actor Mike Kellin, who sadly passed away before the film’s release. Mel does his best to keep his reputation by trying to spin what is happening to the people that are dying in the film. He has a hilarious scene where he appears wearing lime green pants and a yellow jacket in anticipation for a hot date. There’s also a small appearance from Robert Earl Jones as the chef, Ben. He is the father of legendary actor James Earl Jones.

The gore is minimal in comparison to Friday the 13th. The killer uses the surrounding environments to take out its victims one by one. You’ll notice a pattern of whom the victims are. You may think to yourself you already know who the killer is, but the movie uses a bit of trickery to throw off your assumptions. There is a small body count throughout the movie until the very end where the volume doubles.

Mike Kellin gets an arrow to the throat.

Sleepaway Camp balances the kills with some humor. There are plenty of hilarious moments throughout the movie including Rickey and his bunk mates playing tricks on one of their own, the male campers going skinny dipping and some funny mustache miscues. The cop in the movie has a mustache in his first appearance, but when he appears near the end, you can tell the mustache is fake and uneven. The reason for that being is the actor that played the cop had shaved his mustache off after he was done shooting his part but was called back due to additional shooting. Since he couldn’t grow one quickly in time, they had to improvise.

This is the only film writer and director Robert Hiltzik made. He made a career change and today he is an attorney in New York. For what it’s worth, he made a really good slasher film. It’s a movie with a ton of replay value that you can watch repeatedly. You don’t need to be watching it in the summer to enjoy it as it is a film you can watch in any season.

TRIVIA (Per IMDB)

  • The original artwork for the Sleepaway Camp Survival Kit boxed set, which included the unauthorized sequels, was recalled after complaints were made by the American Red Cross.
  • Some of the campers seen getting off the buses at the beginning of the film are relatives of the cast and crew.
  • Jane Krakowski, who played Cousin Vicky in National Lampoon’s Vacation was originally cast to play Judy.
  • Mike Kellin’s final film. He was sick during filming but did his best to conceal it from everyone and passed away in August 1983 from lung cancer, three months before the film’s release.
  • Willy Kuskin who plays the character of Mozart, one of the bullied camp boys, was genuinely bullied during filming. Frank Trent Saladino who played Gene, Mozart’s camp counselor, had to step in to protect Willy at times when the other members would take it too far.
  • Felissa Rose and Jonathan Tiersten developed a puppy love type romance during filming but broke up soon after.
  • Jonathan Tiersten was given the role of Ricky after an unusual audition where the writer/director, Robert Hiltzik, asked Jonathan to cuss him out.
  • As a child, writer/director Robert Hiltzik actually went to the camp which was used in the film.
  • One of the inspirations for ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic’s “Nature Trail to Hell,” along with Friday the 13th Part III (1982), referencing the cutting up of Cub Scouts and an ending you have to see to believe.

AUDIO CLIPS

Any Chips?
Young Fresh Chicken
Wait Until You See Judy
Meg – M.E.G.
She Were Any Quieter She Be Dead
Every Nerve In His Body Is On Fire
Shut Up Mozart
Eat Shit And Live
Getting Caught With Your Pants Down
Hey Bobbery Bob
Angry Lifeguard
Mel’s Rationale
Guess Who?
Makes Things Easier For The Killer
Mel Rants

Critters

Release Date: April 11, 1986

Genre: Sci-Fi, Horror

Director: Stephen Herek  

Writers: Stephen Herek (Screenplay), Domonic Muir (Story & Screenplay), Don Opper (Additional Scenes)

Starring: Dee Wallace, M. Emmet Walsh, Scott Grimes, Billy Green Bush, Nadine Van Der Velde, Don Opper, Terrance Mann

WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS IN THIS REVIEW

Movies that came out in the 80s contained a diverse range of genres. We had horror movies, teen comedies, action packed film and the occasional monster movie. With the success of Gremlins in 1984, fledgling production company New Line Cinema looked to creating a movie similar in nature. With the box office success of A Nightmare on Elm Street 2, New Line Cinema got out of the red in their financial operation and had some money to invest in more projects. One of the projects that was green-lit to be a “sister” film to Gremlins was the movie, Critters.

Released in 1986 Critters is about a group of intergalactic hairball like creatures known by their species name “Krites” that escape from a prison asteroid and use a stolen spaceship to travel to the closest planet that contained the most life for them to feed their bellies, which is Earth. Desperate to stop the Krites from invading Earth and consuming all of its resources, the warden of the prison asteroid dispatches two bounty hunters to track them down and eradicate them. The Krites land in a field in a small town in Kansas called Grover’s Bend. The people of Grover’s Bend are their own characters. You have the Brown family who live on a farm, Charlie McFadden, the town drunk and Harv who is the easily annoyed Sheriff.  Jay Brown and his mischief son Bradley (Brad) head out to the field where they spot the ship crashing. They appear to find some of the herd dead with nothing left of them but their bones. Heading back to the house they encounter one of the Krites who bites several wounds into Jay as well as a poison needle that shoots from their backs, like a porcupine. The Browns become trapped in their home defending themselves against the Critters. Brad risks to find help and comes across the bounty hunters who have taken human forms. He directs the bounty hunters to his home where they see the Krites and begin a melee of destruction in order to kill them all.

The Bradley family along with Grover’s Bend Sheriff Harv.

Critters was a modest hit at the box office generating more that $13 million against a $2 million dollar budget. It would spawn three sequels, which one of them became the acting debut of an unknown kid would become an A- list actor named Leonardo Dicaprio (Critters 3). It was another franchise New Line Cinema had under their belt with their first being Nightmare on Elm Street. There have been talks of a remake, but I’m not a fan of remakes nor would I encourage a remake of this film. The films may look dated and silly, but they’re packed with enough gore and humor to keep your interests high.

The cast is a mixed of veteran character actors and some that are up and coming. The two popular names on the bill are Dee Wallace, who was the mother in E.T. plays the mother in this film and M. Emmett Walsh who has over two hundred credits to his name, is best known for playing a psycho in The Jerk and Harrison Ford’s boss in Blade Runner. Dee Wallace doesn’t do much except scream and cry through most of the film. Walsh plays Sheriff Harv as a short tempered man who feels the town is becoming a zoo. The film revolves around the performances of Scott Grimes who plays Bradley Brown, the younger of the two Brown children. He is mischievous and always getting into fights with his sister, April. He becomes the hero by risking his neck to escape his house surrounded by the Krites to find help.  Don Opper plays Charlie McFadden, the town drunk and close friend to Brad and believes alien life-forces are trying to communicate with him through his teeth fillings. Opper ends up playing a dual role in this film which he does a good job at. I’ll get to the dual part in a moment. Rounding out the central cast are the bounty hunters. They add just as much humor as the Krites do. The bounty hunters are named Ug and Lee (Ugly, get it?). They are faceless aliens and have transforming abilities. To “blend” in with the earthlings they may encounter, both of them look through a video of Earth and its history. Ug notices rock start Johnny Steele in a music video and transforms into him. Ug and Steele are played by Terrance Mann. Lee struggles to find a form to change into.  A recurring gag in the film is Lee changing into multiple people he encounters. He eventually settles on transforming into Charlie after an encounter with him in a bar. They carry giant cannon guns to blow up the Krites, but instead cause destruction at every location they step in. Even their boss pleads with them about being less destructive.  The bounty hunters would become staple characters of the eventual franchise as Mann and Opper are the only two actors to appear in all four movies. Critters includes small appearances from Billy Zane, who plays April’s new boyfriend, a city boy with a nice car and Lin Shaye of Insidious fame playing Sal the dispatcher.

The Bounty Hunters in “Critters.”

The real stars of the film are the Krites. They were created by the Chiodo Brothers (Stephen and Charles) who were known for Claymation, creature creation and puppeteering. They did a great job designing and moving the Krites. They’re described throughout the film series as “man eating hairballs”, which is true. However, they are very intelligent despite their limitations. They have red eyes, razor sharp teeth and needles that can shoot poison at their prey. They move with the speed and velocity of a cannonball. They crash land on Earth after escaping from a prison asteroid. While they repair the ship, they go off to look for food. They eat anything they come into contact with. The more they feed, the more they grow. You will see one of them in the film turn into a giant with the ability to walk upright like a human being. They come into contact with the Brown family and surround their home causing a Rio Bravo like standoff. The Krites are both scary and funny. There are some Three Stooges inspired moments they get into. One scene shows the Krites tearing up Brad’s room. One of the Krites is trying to communicate with a stuffed E.T. doll and when it doesn’t answer its questions, the Krite gets angry and bites his head off. Another funny moment is a Krite getting burnt by a small torch Dee Wallace uses and runs to the bathroom and jumps into the toilet.

This was the directorial debut of Stephen Herek who would go on to direct Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure, The Mighty Ducks and Mr. Holland’s Opus.  I think this is a solid debut and one of his best films in his short filmography.  He does some good things technically. For example, most of the film takes place at night, so Herek uses natural lighting from the moon and flashlights to create a dark tense atmosphere for the Brown family as they investigate what is going on. He also makes good use of the first person view for the Krites. The camera is hovered above the ground and moves stealthily when they’re in hunting mode and then in a racing mode when they’re attacking or trying to reach their prey. The film has its slow moments, but once the Krites appear, the action and the horror pick up and doesn’t end until the final explosion.

Krite

As I mentioned in the beginning this film is very similar in nature to Gremlins. I used the term “sister” film because that’s what it feels like. It doesn’t have Steven Spielberg’s name attached to it, but it’s still a fun monster movie flick. It’s simple so you don’t have to worry about trying to compound narratives or hidden messages or symbolism. It’s a movie where you can lay on the couch and absorb what is taking place. The sequels that followed this film have their good moments and bad moments (mainly due to the budget going way down and the distribution being limited). I would put this movie in my Top 100 80s Films of All Time.

TRIVIA (Per IMDB)

  • Corey Burton, who voices the Critters, also came up with their language, which he described in interviews as combining elements of French and Japanese.
  • Terrence Mann performs the song “Power of the Night” as Johnny Steele especially for this movie.
  • This is the second movie (the other being E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial [1982]) with Dee Wallace in which her on-screen son heats up an oral thermometer in order to appear sick to avoid going to school. In E.T. she is fooled, but doesn’t buy it at all second time around in Critters [1986]
  • Don Opper and Terrence Mann are the only actors to appear in all four Critters films. Their characters, Charlie McFadden and Ug, respectively, appear in all four Critters movies.

AUDIO CLIPS

You Miss That Bus
Morning Harv
Charlie, It’s Jeff
I’ll Stand on the Fifth Amendment
What Are You Doing Up There?
Smells Like Oil Burning
Transform
Feeding Starts
Call Harv
What The Hell Are Those Things?
We Want The Krites
Keep Your Shirt On, Asshole
They Were Wearing Funny Clothes
I’m Not Reading You
Who Did Your Bring?
Swallowed My Chewing Tobacco

RIP Joel Schumacher. My 10 Favorite Films.

Joel Schumacher passed away Monday, June 22 from cancer at the age of 80.

This past Monday the movie world lost another influential filmmaker. Joel Schumacher made films that had a sense of style, deep mystery, emotionally developed characters and were risk takers. While many associate him with directing the last two Batman movies of the 90s and essentially ruined the Caped Crusader’s continuing on the big screen for a while, Schumacher made emotionally gripping movies that were successful in their own right. He took on projects that numerous directors would not touch due to the subject matter. For Schumacher they were challenges and they paid off. In honor of his legacy, here is a list of my ten favorite movies from Joel Schumacher. These are listed in order so debates are welcomed.

10. Batman Forever

Val Kilmer as the Caped Crusader in “Batman Forever.”

Yes, I know Batman Forever is more like Batman Forgettable, but I have fond memories of the movie going back to when I was ten years old and my mother took me to the theaters to see it opening night. Schumacher takes the Dark Knight in a different direction combining the dark storytelling of Tim Burton with campier villains complete with costumes that have a bit of the tv show influence and are placed in a much bigger and brighter Gotham City. The themes of the film involve deep secrets, revenge and overcoming fears. Val Kilmer puts on the cape and cowl for his only appearance in the franchise as he deals with his nightmares that are triggered after the death of Dick Grayson’s parents who were murdered by Two-Face. Kilmer’s Batman is one dimensional at times not differentiating between the Bruce Wayne persona and Batman. Nicole Kidman plays the love interest who seduces Batman throughout the movie in order to know the man behind the mask. Tommy Lee Jones’ portrayal as Harvey “Two Face” Dent looks like someone who is high on coke rather than someone with a dual personality struggling to deal with what’s right and wrong. Then there’s Jim Carrey playing himself in a Riddler costume that is heavily influenced from Frank Gorshin’s look in the TV show and then there’s Chris O’Donnell as the boy wonder Robin complete with puns that would make Burt Ward cringe. Nevertheless, there is something about Batman Forever that makes it a guilty pleasure viewing.

9. Blood Creek

A deadite in “Blood Creek.”

Joel Schumacher returns to horror in a film about a Nazinecromancer raising the dead to do his bidding. It’s up to two brothers to stop him. Features a great cast including Henry Cavill, Dominic Purcell and Michael Fassbender in once again another haunting performance, Blood Creek is great from a stylistic standpoint which has always been Schumacher’s strongest trait as a filmmaker. Unfortunately the story falls under its own weight as it turns from what could’ve been a great premise into a typical group is trapped with a monster and must kill it before it kills them. If you’re a horror devotee like myself, Blood Creek is worth a viewing.

8. St. Elmo’s Fire

St. Elmo’s Fire introduced the world to the “Brat Pack.”

The movie that gave birth to the “Brat Pack,” St. Elmo’s Fire is a film that continues to be a influential film generation after generation. Schumacher tells a story about growing up and the struggles that come with adulthood. St. Elmo’s Fire feels over dramatic at times, but I enjoyed the film through the performances. Each character in the film not only had their own distinct personalities, but their own flaws which make them relatable. You may not understand the decisions they make throughout the story, but it’s decisions that we may have found ourselves having to make those decisions that are in the best interests. St. Elmo’s Fire is a film that reminds us that life isn’t perfect and we’re not perfect people, but we continue to move forward.

7. Falling Down

Michael Douglas goes postal in “Falling Down.”

Falling Down took me a long time to discover. I’ve heard of the film, but could not for the life of me figure out the title. I also didn’t know that this was a Joel Schumacher film until I finally watched it for the first time. Falling Down is a simple concept of a man who is at his breaking point and starts to violently lash out at those he comes across as he walks the streets of Los Angeles in order to get to the home of his ex-wife so he could see his daughter for her birthday. Michael Douglas plays William “De-Fens” Foster, an unemployed defense engineer for the government who is a ticking time bomb waiting to explode. He is not intimidated by the people he comes across and won’t let them get in his way of going home. While Douglas plays the anger and rage of the film, Robert DuVall plays the calm and collective detective Pendergast who is working his last day on the job before retirement and is caught up in the events that are going on. Douglas and DuVall are essentially the yin and yang of the movie. Falling Down represents how we as humans have our breaking point and finding the difficulties adapting to an ever changing world and the fear of being obsolete. It’s an intense thriller that you must check out if you haven’t already. Thank goodness for streaming!

6. A Time To Kill

Matthew McConaughey and Samuel L. Jackson in “A Time To Kill.”

Based on the best selling novel by John Grisham, A Time To Kill is an example of a film where Schumacher took high risks and paid off both commercially and critically. The movie deals with a sickening act and a man being put on trial for simply defending his daughter after being violated. With over powering performances from a eclectic cast, A Time To Kill is set at a time that Americans continue to deal with to this day. Schumacher’s direction is spot on and well paced. It is a film that is emotionally charged and can bring a sense of hope that justice still works in the favor of those seeking it.

5. The Client

Brad Renfro and David Speck in “The Client.”

Schumacher’s first John Grisham adaptation is a dark, tense and heart pounding thrill ride with great performances and careful pacing. The Client features Brad Renfro in his film debut as Mark Sway, who becomes a witness to the suicide of a mob lawyer who reveals to him where the body of a missing Louisiana Senator may be. Being sought by the U.S. Attorney’s office and it’s ambitious prosecutor “Reverend” Roy Foltrigg, played by Tommy Lee Jones in another brilliant performance, Mark hires Reggie Love, played by Susan Sarandon for a dollar to defend him. The Client reminds me of another influential drama piece, The Fugitive. Both films are similar in nature. What stands this movie out is the building of the relationship between Mark and Reggie. Both of them slowly learn to trust each other if they’re ever going to get out of the situations they find themselves in. This is one of the few films that follows the book page by page without hacking it to pieces in order to add flair and dramatic emphasis. The film also features early roles for future well known actors including Kim Coates, Anthony LaPaglia and Will Patton.

4. Flatliners

Kiefer Sutherland, Kevin Bacon, Julia Roberts and Olvier Platt in “Flatliners.”

Featuring an ensemble cast including Kiefer Sutherland, Julia Roberts, William Baldwin, Kevin Bacon and Oliver Platt, Flatliners is the story of five medical students who conduct experiments on themselves in order to physically prove the existence of life after death. As each of them cross over, they see visions of their past which begins to trigger and traumatize them when they are revived. Flatliners is a tense flick with a dark atmosphere and a cast of characters that provide a cocktail of intelligence, cockiness and fear. Sutherland and Roberts’s chemistry carries the film as they each deal with their own nightmares of past situations they experience when they were children. The film’s plot gets repetitive after awhile, but there is so much going on in Flatliners to literally make your heart stop.

3. The Lost Boys

BillyWirth, Kiefer Sutherland, Brooke McCarter and Alex Winter in “The Lost Boys.”

Perhaps the most beloved movie in Joel Schumacher’s filmography, The Lost Boys has a deep meaning for many fans. A new take on vampire lore, The Lost Boys is filled with elements taken from different genres and blends them into a wild ride viewing for the audience. The movie is known for its beautiful cinematography, it’s California setting, killer soundtrack and some of the best makeup and special effects in a movie of this nature. How could I forget the cast? I love the performances in this film especially Corey Feldman and Jamison Newlander as The Frog Brothers. Did I mention this was the film that gave birth to the Two Coreys? The Lost Boys deals with themes of youth, innocence and trying to fit in which is something we’ve all had to deal with. The Lost Boys is a staple 80s film that continues to pick up a new legion of fans.

2. Phone Booth

Colin Farrell in “Phone Booth.”

Phone Booth is a suspense thriller that is a callback to the style of film making legend Alfred Hitchcock. Schumacher directs the movie taken from a script written by B-Movie auteur Larry Cohen about a publicist who enters a phone booth only to be trapped in it when a sniper calls him and tells him that he has a rifle pointed at his head. From there it leads to a triangular standoff when the police get involved. Phone Booth takes place in one location all throughout the movie which again is a callback to Hitchcock and his film Rear Window. There is so much tension and pressure in the movie that you could easily miss with the blink of an eye. The small cast including Colin Farrell, Kiefer Sutherland and Forest Whitaker give heart pounding performances. It’s odd seeing Sutherland playing a bad guy in this since 24 started around the same time and launched his television career playing Jack Bauer. Phone Booth is a great tribute to the suspenseful films of the Hollywood golden era.

1. 8MM

Nicolas Cage and James Gandolfini in “8MM”

There’s something about 8MM which makes this my absolute favorite Joel Schumacher film. After the condemnation of Batman & Robin, Schumacher rolled the dice and took on a film that no one wanted to touch. 8MM brings to life the myth of snuff films and ventures into the dark and dangerous world of underground pornography. Nicolas Cage plays a private detective hired by the widow of a industrial millionaire to seek out if the film found in his private safe is real, who made the film and the identity of the victim. He teams up with a purveyor of porn named Max California played by Joaquin Phoenix to help make contacts and get him one step closer to solving the case. Cage finds himself getting dragged deeper and deeper into the seedy world which warps his mind. The best line in the movie sums up Cage’s character when Phoenix warns him that, “You dance with the devil, the devil doesn’t change. The devil changes you.” 8MM is filled with dark, grizzly images and the biggest lowlifes portrayed on film. Peter Stomare and James Gandolfini play characters you just loathe and hope nothing but the worse for them. The movie does leave some questions unanswered, but there’s so much going on in this movie that these questions will slip your mind.

So what did you think of this list? Was there a movie I missed? Feel free to leave a comment. Thank you for reading!

A Nightmare On Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge

Release Date: November 1, 1985

Genre: Horror

Director: Jack Sholder  

Writers: David Chaskin (Screenplay), Wes Craven (Characters)

Starring: Mark Patton, Kim Myers, Robert Englund, Robert Rusler, Clu Gulager, Marshall Bell

WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS IN THIS REVIEW

In 1984 movie audiences were introduced to a new form of terror. They were introduced to a character who killed his victims in his dreams. They were introduced to Freddy Kruger in A Nightmare on Elm Street. It made over $25 million dollars in the United States box office alone and turned Freddy Kruger into a new horror icon. Despite the instant success which launched the careers of Wes Craven, Robert Englund and yes Johnny Depp, fledgling studio New Line Cinema didn’t make a profit off the film. They were still in the red and desperately trying to stay afloat. New Line Cinema Founder and CEO Robert Shaye decided to take a gamble and make a direct sequel to “Elm Street” in the hopes of creating some cash flow. Nearly a year after its initial release, New Line released the follow up film, A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge.

Instead of a direct continuation of the first film, the second film follows a whole new cast of characters, but the setting of Springwood, Ohio remained the same. The film focuses on Jesse Walsh, a new resident of Springwood who moves into Nancy Thompson’s old house along with his family. Shortly after moving in, he is visited in his dreams by Freddy whose goal is to takeover Jesse’s body so he can return to the physical world. The film was another financial win for New Line which got the return they were expecting plus more and thus a franchise was born. Despite the success, the film itself received mixed reviews calling it a weak retread of the predecessor and a rushed film that has poor acting, poor dialogue, and not enough scares.

I loved the original Nightmare on Elm Street film. Recently, I watched all the sequels in the franchise (except for the 2010 abysmal reboot). After a Saturday film festival at my home I started to evaluate the sequels. It was a mixed bag. Some of the sequels I enjoyed and some I didn’t. Part 2 was the one that really stood out for me for many reasons, which I’m about to get into.

The film is good technically. The picture seems to be grainy. Not sure if this is due to Jack Sholder trying to make a grittier version of the film. In the same documentary, Sholder admits that he wasn’t a fan of the first film and his objective was to not follow the template of the first film and make something completely different, which he did. Except for one scene, there aren’t that many creative kills that you saw in the first film or the sequels that will follow this one. The concept is bringing Freddy into the real world. You can’t do a lot of supernatural things in the real world (although coming into the real world for Freddy is supernatural). Like its predecessor, the cast is made up of some relatively unknown character actors with the exceptions of Hope Lange and Clu Gulager who played the parents. Both have a combined sixty years of acting experience. I felt each actor fit their roles perfectly, especially Mark Patton. It’s incredible who Patton beat out for the lead role (see trivia below). Looking at that list, Patton was the right choice. Although Patton had a few acting credits before doing this movie, this film is really an introduction of who Mark Patton the person is. The chemistry he had with Kim Myers who plays Lisa, his close friend and love interest is strong, and they balance each other out (Patton and Myers remain close friends to this day and travel to Horror Conventions together).

Mark Patton and Robert Englund.

The opening scene of the film is Jesse and two girls sitting in a school bus on his way to school. Suddenly the bus driver speeds up and plows through a desert where the ground begins to crack and sink and Freddy appears as the driver. This film tells you from this opening scene that Freddy is about to take Jesse for a ride and you the audience are going to be there with him. That opening shot is a credit to Sholder’s visual technique that you will see all throughout the film.

Nightmare on Elm Street 2 is regarded as “The Gayest Horror Film Ever Made.” And there’s truth to it. The film is known for its notoriously homoerotic subtext. You see it throughout the entire film from the characters to the props and the story. The writer of the film David Chaskin was working at New Line Cinema in another department and had written a treatment for a potential sequel that dealt with the paranoia of AIDS and homosexuality and incorporated Freddy Krueger as the disease. New Line Cinema chose his script and got the ball rolling on production. If you watch the series documentary Never Sleep Again, the crew from the film and even Robert Shaye talked about how they never intended it to be a gay film. Even director Jack Sholder didn’t admit that he didn’t have the self-awareness to believe that anything they were doing would be interpreted as being gay. One production designer said in best in the documentary, “We were all incredibly naïve or all incredibly latently gay!” I enjoyed this film due to the fact they were able to take a real issue in society and create a narrative that was shocking and scary.

The film primarily focuses on Jesse and Freddy’s relationship to each other. Mark Patton, who plays Jesse in the film was openly gay in real life (although he had not mentioned it to anyone on the set) and incorporates the struggles of his sexuality into Jesse. Jesse becomes attracted to both his male and female close friends in Lisa and Ron Grady. Lisa is obviously attracted to Jesse, but throughout the movie, Jesse seems timid and shy around her, but when it comes to Grady, he instantly clicks to his bad boy persona (which most girls in society today seem to be attracted to). Meanwhile Freddy is trying to convince Jesse to kill for him. Freddy represents the self-hatred that one might have of the thought that they may be homosexual. Robert Englund does a brilliant job of using seduction and manipulation to get to Jesse and use him for his own desires. This is relatable to what is going on in society today with the sexual abuse allegations and the Me Too movement. Men using methods of persuasion to get to the body of a woman.  The victims in the movie are a threat to Freddy in a way that is considered jealousy. He is removing obstacles so that no one interferes with Freddy’s impending host. Finally, the sequence of Freddy tearing through Jesse’s body can be interpreted as Jesse “coming out”.

Mark Patton slowly transforming into Freddy Krueger.

The props and scenes in the movie heightened the narrative. When Lisa is helping Jesse unpack his belongings and puts some things in his closet, you can see a board game titled “Probe”.  In Jesse’s room he has a sign on his front door that says, “No Girls Allowed”. I don’t think you see a lot of teenage boys have that kind of sign in their room. In one of the night sequences when Jesse is getting out of bed, it is so hot in his room you can see his candle melting and shaped like a part of the male genitalia. If you look closely in the shower scene, the shower heads are phallic shaped. In the scene where Coach Schneider is attacked by presumably Freddy, tennis balls are popping out of their cans, Schneider is tied up in the shower by jump rope and flying towels begin to snap at his bare bottom. There was something Freudian going on in that scene.

Finally, Nightmare on Elm Street 2 has a fairy tale side to it, which involves Jesse and Lisa. Because she is in love with Jesse, Lisa is trying to save him from Freddy but doesn’t know how. She pleads with Jesse to let her help him, but he pushes her away. When he transforms into Freddy and escapes, she chases him down and continues to plead for him to come back to her. In a ‘Beauty in the Beast’ moment, she says she loves him and the beast (being Freddy) dies and out of the ashes comes the beauty (Jesse). They hold each other in their arms and embrace that their nightmare is over….or is it?

Kim Myers gives a fairy tale kiss.

To recap, I strongly affirm my opinion that Nightmare on Elm Street 2 is the strongest of the sequels in the Nightmare franchise.  Unlike the latter films which were comical and cartoonish, this film feels real and authentic. This movie still holds up thirty five years later and it is a social film that can be explored, enjoyed and talked about for many decades to come. I would also recommend checking out the new documentary about Mark Patton and his experience on Nightmare on Elm Street 2 titled Scream Queen: My Nightmare on Elm Street, which is currently streaming on Shudder.

TRIVIA (Per IMDB)

  • New Line Cinema originally refused to give Robert Englund a pay raise, and an extra was cast as Freddy at the start of production. The extra appears in the shower scene where Jesse turns into Freddy, He simply wore a rubber mask and moved like “Frankenstein”. After two weeks of filming, director Jack Sholder convinced New Line Cinema CEO/Founder/Executive Produce Robert Shaye that this was a terrible lapse in judgment, and Shaye met Englund’s demands to return for the sequel.
  • The only “Nightmare” film in which the lead character is male.
  • Mark Patton beat out Brad Pitt and Christian Slater for the role of Jesse.
  • Apart from Robert Englund, this is the only film in the franchise to neither feature an actor from a previous film, nor have one return in a sequel.
  • New Line Cinema CEO/Founder/Executive Robert Shaye wanted to play the character of Grady’s father. However, director Jack Sholder told him that he “Needed a real actor to play that role.” Fearing that he would be fired after the comment, Sholder cast Shaye as the bartender in the S&M Bar that Jesse visits in the film.
  • Special Effects man Rick Lazzarini created a “demonic parakeet” puppet for the scene in which the Walsh’s pet bird flies around and explodes. His puppet was not used because the filmmakers wanted to use a regular looking bird.
  • Kevin Yagher replaced David Miller as the makeup effects artist. Studying pictures of burn victims, Yagher redesigned Freddy’s look to bring out the facial bones and more scaring. He would go on in his career to create the Chucky doll in the “Child’s Play” franchise.

AUDIO CLIPS

FU Man Fingers
Nice Ass
Assume The Position, Dirtballs
The Deadly Dinosaur
We’ve Got Special Work To Do Here
Jesse Screams
If You Want To Play With Animals
Do You Remember Your Dreams?
How Do You Like That, Dad?
Grady Talking With His Mouth Full
Shut Up, Grady
What That Boy Needs
Something Is Trying To Get Inside My Body
He’s Inside Me
Turn Down The Heat
You Are All My Children Now

Bill & Ted: Face The Music Trailer Has Arrived

Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter make their long awaited return in “Bill & Ted: Face The Music!”

Finally, after decades of rumors and requests from fans, Bill S. Preston, Esquire and Ted Theodore Logan are making their return to the big screen after a twenty-nine year hiatus.

Today, Orion Pictures released the first trailer for the third installment in the Bill & Ted movie series. Bill & Ted: Face The Music sees the Wyld Stallyns in their biggest adventure yet. Now middle aged men with children, Bill & Ted (played once again by Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter) are warned by a visitor from the future that they need to create a song within the next seventy-eight minutes in order to not only save Earth, but the entire universe. The film also stars Brigette Lundy-Paine, Samara Weaving, Anthony Carrigan and William Sadler, who is returning as Death from the previous film Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey. In addition to the return of Reeves and Winter, Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon are back as the writers. The film is being directed Dean Parisot, whose directorial credits include Galaxy Quest and Red 2.

In the official trailer which clocks in at one minute and thirty-three seconds, we see the duo recite their infamous quote of, “Be Excellent To Each Other” and “Party On Dude!,” which is surely needed in these troubling times. From there we see quit shot of their daughters, going through the passages of time, giving a high five to Death and of course the return of the ancient Phone Booth. The trailer ends with them encountering their buffed up future selves in a prison yard where they asked if they liked their song, to which Reeves’s Ted replies, “It’s a little on the dark side, but you know it’s cool!”

As a fan of the first two movies, I was beyond ecstatic when I heard a third movie was in the works. The trailer released today did not disappointed. While Reeves does look scruffier and has a scratchier voice, it’s great to see Alex Winter back on the big screen even though he’s had a successful career as a filmmaker, most notably in the recent documentary The Panama Papers and will be releasing a documentary on music legend Frank Zappa. Seeing Wililam Sadler return as the reaper himself should provide many awkward moments. The addition of Bill & Ted’s daughters should be interesting to the plot especially with the revelation of their children from the previous film.

Bill & Ted: Face The Music will be released in theaters nationwide on August 21st. If you missed out on the first two films or would like to revisit them, you can purchase the Bill & Ted’s Most Excellent Collection on Blu-Ray via Shout Factory. You can check out the trailer below if you haven’t seen it yet.

August will surely be a most excellent day!

Official Trailer

Meet Wally Sparks

Meet Wally Sparks

Release Date: January 31, 1997

Genre: Comedy

Director: Peter Baldwin  

Writers: Harry Basil (Story), Rodney Dangerfield (Screenplay)

Starring: Rodney Dangerfield, Debi Mazar, David Ogden Stiers, Burt Reynolds, Mark L. Taylor

WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS IN THIS REVIEW

Rodney Dangerfield was one of the greatest stand up comedians the world had ever seen. He was known for his zinging one liners and monologues preaching about he gets “no respect”. His career was heightened in 1980 when he stole the spotlight in the 1980 golf comedy Caddyshack which lead to starring roles in the films “Easy Money” and the critically acclaimed Back To School. Unfortunately the 90s weren’t so good to Dangerfield. He had two films that flopped and was being overshadowed by the young fresh talent that appeared on Saturday Night Live and In Living Color. One of his last starring roles was 1997’s Meet Wally Sparks.

In the film, Dangerfield plays the titular character who is the host of a sleazy daytime talk show that rivals Jerry Springer, Geraldo Rivera and Sally Jesse Raphael to name a few (all have cameos in the movies). His show has become so raunchy and X-Rated that he is losing sponsors and being threatened with cancellation. In addition, his show has been publicly criticized by Floyd Preston, the conservative Governor of Georgia (David Ogden Stiers) as corrupting the moral fabric of the country. Wally is given an ultimatum by his boss Larry Spencer (Burt Reynolds) to clean up his show or else he will pull the plug. Wally receives an invitation to attend Governor Preston’s fundraiser reception at the Governor’s Mansion (unbeknownst to the Governor, the invitation was sent by his rebellious pre teen son) and his producer Sandy Gallo (Debi Mazar) comes up with an idea to persuade the Governor to appear on his show, which would instantly boost ratings and could change the format of the show.

Wally and Sandy attend the reception in search of the governor. During the party, Wally heads to the governor’s stable and gives his prized horse some alcohol. The horse breaks free from the stable and runs amok inside the Governor’s Mansion. Wally is able to tame the horse and prevent it from hurting the Governor. The presses label him a hero in the papers the next morning. Believing to have been paralyzed from the injury, Wally is staying at the Governor’s Mansion to recuperate, much to the chagrin of Governor Preston. The mansion gets trashed due to Wally’s production company setting up shop inside the mansion and Wally continues to get into shenanigans involving Mrs. Preston. In addition, Wally’s adult son Dean begins a relationship with Governor Preston’s southern bell daughter Priscilla. If that wasn’t enough for Governor Preston to deal with, he is being blackmailed by an outside entity to drop out of the Senate race otherwise, photos showing Governor Preston and an unidentified woman in steamy erotic photos would be released to the public. Wally goes on a mission to find out who is blackmailing the Governor and in return earn his trust to come onto his show and address his supporters.

Rodney Dangerfield as America’s most controversial talk show host.

This movie is based on the tabloid daytime talk shows that dominated television airwaves and a statement on the First Amendment. Throughout the 90s, you couldn’t turn on a television channel without seeing some kind of over the top show. You had the FCC and other government entities looking to block any kind of media in effort to “protect the children”. Wally Sparks represents freedom of speech and freedom of expression while Governor Preston represents the government looking to shut down entertainment that is considered obscene or vulgar. The war continues even to this day with the rise of social media.

Obviously Dangerfield is the shining star of the film. There are plenty of yucks to go around. The jokes are a lot cruder than any of his previous outings, but given the subject matter of the film, it fits in with the narrative. There’s a lot more physical comedy from Dangerfield in this film than any previous film that I can recall. Most of it comes during the reception scene. One thing that is special about Dangerfield is he is able to play lovable characters. His characters start out as self center egotists, but during the course of his movies they start to feel a heart for others. This film follows the same formula. Wally’s objective in the beginning is to have a showdown with Governor Preston on his show in an effort to save him from the unemployment line. However, during the course of the movie as he is spending time getting to know the Preston family, he is grateful for their hospitality and when Governor Preston is in a pickle with a blackmail threat, Wally feels that he needs to repay the debt shown by helping Preston out with his situation.

The other shining performance comes from David Ogden Stiers, who sadly passed away a few days ago. He portrays Floyd Preston, the Governor of Georgia and a leader of the moral majority. He finds Wally Sparks and his show repulsive and is on a crusade to get him thrown off the air. To make matters worse, Preston is powerless to kick Sparks out of the mansion when he is hurt from the incident at the mansion involving a horse. His adviser warns him that kicking him out will diminish his reputation as a moral compassionate human being. In addition, Sparks’ presence in the mansion starts to attract younger voters who are fans of the show in supporting Preston’s campaign for Senator. Preston certainly comes at a cross road and becomes consumed with his battle over Sparks that he starts to alienate himself from his family and causing them to rebel against him. Stiers is a big man and he fits the role of a governor well. He has quite a few laughable moments involving situations that he falls upon.

Burt Reynolds plays Dangerfield’s boss, Larry Spencer.

As for the rest of the cast, the performances were pretty shallow, especially Burt Reynolds. For all the talk regarding loss of sponsors and fines from the FCC, Reynolds doesn’t sound the least bit concerned. He is really out of place in the movie. Anyone could’ve portrayed the role of Larry Spencer better than he did. Luckily, he’s only in a few scenes that you could skip over if you wanted to.

One of the notable things about this movie is the number of cameos. As I mentioned in the beginning of the review, there are cameos featuring Jerry Springer, Geraldo Rivera and Sally Jesse Raphael. In addition, other talk show personalities that have a cameo include Roseanne, Morton Downey Jr. and Tim Allen (playing his “Home Improvement” character). It’s funny to see them all berate Wally Sparks and call him a has been and the fact that he is still alive. Other cameos include Bob Saget and Stuttering John Melendez playing news reporters, Gilbert Gottfried and Julia Sweeny playing a married couple on Wally’s show and Tony Danza playing his character from Taxi.

With the laughs that this movie has, it is not without its flaws. I didn’t like the pacing of the movie. The movie starts out with Dangerfield going full force at a hundred miles an hour, but then it slows down during the middle of the film and it comes to a screeching halt. It goes from being funny to dramatic. It gets mushy with Wally’s son and Preston’s daughter developing a relationship against the will of the Governor. Another flaw is the ridiculous cartoonish scenes involving Spencer’s top assistant who detests Wally and is spying on him to see if he is actually injured or if he is faking it. He is falling out of trees and getting dragged behind a car. It’s reminiscent of a Wild E. Coyote cartoon. It really had no place in the movie. Lastly, the climax of the movie was so mindless and childish. Again it’s pretty cartoonish with the final confrontation between Wally and the people who are blackmailing the Governor.

Dangerfield showing off his dance moves.

If you’re a fan of Rodney Dangerfield, this movie is right up your alley. Those who are not fans are advised to turn away. While Meet Wally Sparks is not one of Rodney Dangerfield’s most memorable films, it will be remembered for Rodney doing what Rodney does best, which is making us laugh.

TRIVIA (Per IMDB)

  • Students in Daingerfield, Texas’ schools got an early release day, because the town gave Rodney Dangerfield a parade, and a street renamed in his honor, when he came to town.
  • One of two Rodney Dangerfield films that feature a vocal performance by Michael Bolton, the other being Back to School (1986). Bolton’s song “Everybody’s Crazy” is playing on the record player during the frat dorm party.
  • Tony Danza reprises his role as Tony from the hit TV show “Taxi” in this film.
  • Gilbert Gottfried who has a small part in the film said on his podcast that he has never seen the finished release.

AUDIO CLIPS

Hard To Believe
Siskel and Ebert Review
You Lost Another Sponsor
Ratings Chart
Governor I’m Crushed
Don’t Go Soft
It’s Just A Drink
Wide As The Mississippi
Stuttering John
That’s Why We Call Him Egypt
Don’t Lift Anything Over Ten Pounds
Talk Soup
What Happened?
I Love Peacocks
I’ve Got A Straight
Great Balls of Fire
Great Grandaddy

Johnny Mnemonic

Release Date: May 26, 1995

Genre: Action, Drama, Sci-Fi   

Director: Robert Lungo    

Writer: William Gibson

Starring: Keanu Reeves, Dina Meyer, Takeshi Kitano, Ice-T, Dolph Lundgren, Henry Rollins, Udo Kier

WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS IN THIS REVIEW

Based on the novel of the same name by William Gibson, Johnny Mnemonic takes place in the year 2021. Johnny (Reeves) is a courier with a data storage device in his brain allowing him to transfer sensitive information to his destination without worry of it being stolen on the net. The cost of this implant results in Johnny not being able to retain memories of his childhood. He wishes to have his implant remove, but does not have the money for an operation. His boss Ralfi (Udo Kier) gives him one final job to perform in which the amount is more than enough to get the operation. Johnny heads to Beijing to collect the data, however is told that the data amount exceeds his memory capacity which is at 80 gigabytes. The data he is retrieving is 320 gigabytes. An overflow of data would cause not only psychological damage but death if it is not removed within a certain time frame. Using a compression unit that would handle the data in his head, Johnny collects the data from his clients, a group of scientists and selects three random images to use at an encryption key. Before the scientists can send the key to the data receiver, they are ambushed and killed by the Yakuza. Johnny escapes with part of the key and heads back to Newark where he is then pursued by a pharmaceutical executive named Takahashi (Takeshi Kitano) who wants the data for himself. Receiving assistance from a bodyguard named Jane (Diana Meyer) and J-Bone (Ice-T) the leader of an anti-government group called the Loteks, Johnny must get the data removed from his brain and delivered to the correct destination before he is killed either by various contractors that Takahashi hires or by the data that is inside his brain.

Johnny Mnemonic has been called a precursor to Reeve’s blockbuster hit The Matrix, which would come out four years later. It does have some elements of the latter film, but they are still two different films. This film has the look and feel of a futuristic cyberpunk movie. It merges technology with a rugged industrial look. The dystopian world that is presented is nothing new in these types of movies but is essential to the overall plot of the movie.

Keanu Reeves as the titular character.

The performance of Keanu Reeves is what you would expect it to be from him. It’s wooden and doesn’t have much heart or emotion. It lacks any kind of energy. You would think with the situation he is in and his life at risk, he would be concerned about making it through the movie alive. The whole time he complains about trying to get this data out of his head. Thankfully the supporting cast of great character actors help keep the movie from becoming a total bore. You’ve got the lovely Dina Meyer as bodyguard Jane who becomes Johnny’s protector, Udo Kier as Johnny’s boss, Ralphie, Ice-T as resistance leader J-Bone, Henry Rollins as Spider, the man who is willing to remove the chip from Johnny’s head and Japanese acting legend Takeshi Kitano in his first American movie appearance as the CEO of the pharmaceutical corporation who is desperate to get the information out of Johnny’s head that he goes to great extremes.

The best and most surprising performance of the movie goes to Dolph Lundgren as the Street Preacher. Yes, he’s a real preacher who recites biblical verses and refers to himself as the savior or “Jesus”. However, behind his oath is a brutal hunter who stalks Johnny everywhere he goes. He is just like the Terminator as he will not stop until he completes his mission. It was weird at first to see Lundgren in this kind of a role, but he really puts a lot of dedication in his part. He was funny and menacing at the same time.

Dolph Lundgren as the menacing “Street Preacher.”

The special effects were reminiscent of the effects seen in The Lawnmower Man especially during some of the virtual reality scenes. One thing that sets this movie apart from some of the others is the use of creative gadgets such as a laser whip and other weapons that the resistance members have made. There’s plenty of fighting and other action sequences that breathe some life into the dull plot-line. Director Robert Lungo essentially tries to make his own version of Blade Runner! Sadly, this would be Lungo’s only movie he directed as he has never been given another opportunity to make another movie which is a shame. I think it was decent with what he was given, but the script doesn’t give Gibson’s novel much justice.

Johnny Mnemonic is one of the ultimate “Guilty Pleasure” movies that is out there. It’s a love/hate movie. For those who still enjoy it like I do, it’s a 90s Sci-Fi flick that would become a blueprint for this style of film making that was only a few years away. I don’t think if it weren’t for this movie, we may never have gotten a “Matrix” movie nor would it be of the same caliber and innovative film that it became. This movie is better placed into the B-Movie category alongside some other underappreciated movies of this style and concept.

Ice-T, Keanu Reeves and Dina Meyer.

TRIVIA (PER IMDB)

  • The script was rumored to have been dumped on the doorstep of Keanu Reeves’ house, a tactic that piqued his interest, and led to him accepting the role of Johnny.
  • At one point, Johnny’s brain implant is detected by a security scanner and is falsely reported as a device for counteracting dyslexia. Keanu Reeves does in fact suffer from the disorder in real-life.
  • Robert Longo and William Gibson originally intended to make an art film on a small budget, but failed to get financing. Longo commented that the project “started out as an arty $1.5 million movie, and it became a $30 million movie, because we couldn’t get a million and a half.”
  • Dina Meyer’s first feature film.
  • Val Kilmer was originally set to star, but left the project after he was offered the role of Batman in Batman Forever (1995). Kilmer later played Chris Shilerhis in Heat (1995), a role that Keanu Reeves was in early talks for, but ultimately turned down.
  • According to William Gibson, the movie was re-edited by the producers in order to make it more “mainstream”. The Japanese release is said to be closer to the director’s and Gibson’s original vision.
  • The only feature film Robert Lungo directed.

AUDIO CLIPS

Pick Up Ralfie
Snatch Back Your Brain Zombie
Hit Me
Next Time Knock
Where Is He Taking The Data?
What’s Going On Here, Ralfie?
We’ve Got All Night Asshole
Say Bye
Time To Go
Not On The Head
I Need A Computer
You Need Someone Brought To Jesus?
Just Johnny
Street Preacher’s Out
Why Did You Have To Do That?
Halt Sinners
I Want Room Service
Come To Jesus

Escape From L.A. Collector’s Edition Blu-Ray Review

New Artwork Cover for Collector’s Edition of “Escape From L.A.”

While the COVID-19 pandemic may have put movie theaters on hold, it’s not stopping video companies from releasing new titles for fans to own. Shout Factory is no exception as they continue to release new Collector’s Editions of movies. This week they released a new title in their growing John Carpenter library starring one of his most iconic characters ever written for film. I’m talking of course about antihero Snake Plissken as he goes from the Big Apple to the City of Angels in the 1996 film “Escape From L.A.!”

“Escape From L.A” was pretty much a remake/retelling of the first movie. Set in 2013, Snake is once again captured and is tasked by the government to rescue the rogue daughter of the President of the United States whom is in possession of a device that could obliterate the world. The film was known for its near shot for shot resemblance of its predecessor complete with a big named cast for the time and dated effects. It’s $50 million budget was the biggest ever for a Carpenter movie. The film released to mixed reviews from critics and fans and recuperated half of its money at the box office.

Kurt Russell returns as Snake Plissken in “Escape From L.A.”

Shout Factory’s new Collector’s Edition of “Escape From L.A.” restores the film in 4K using the original negative and includes several new interviews with the cast and crew along with the Theatrical Trailer all in a special box with a reversible cover sleeve. Shout Factory continues to impress me with its original artwork. The color scheme made the film look bold and futuristic. As I do with all the Collector’s Edition movies from Shout Factory, I reverse the cover art on the Blu Ray box so I have the original art on the box and the official theatrical poster inside the Blu Ray sleeve. It’s a habit of mine, but I do it out of appreciation as I reflect on the film’s origins and its revival.

Reversible Cover Sleeve Features The Original Poster.

 I just finished watching the film. Although I do not have a 4K television the transfer of the film is slick. The colors and the lighting of the movie really come out onto the screen. One thing I was clearly looking for while watching this was how the cheap effects of the original print would look on this new transition. The scene where Snake travels to Los Angeles via submarine looks smoother and hides away some of the dated CGI. Another scene that improved from its previous theatrical and video counterparts is the motorcycle chase scene where Snake jumps onto a truck. That scene was cleaned up to make it not look like an obvious blue/green screen scene. While these are much wanted improvements, there are some scenes that still stick out like sore thumbs. The infamous surfing scene looks glossy and colorful but does not hold up. Overall, it was great revisiting this movie even if it’s nothing more than a doppelganger of its predecessor.

As for the bonus extras, there are a total of six new interviews featuring certain members of the cast and crew. The interviews feature Stacy Keach, Bruce Campbell, frequent Carpenter actor Peter Jason, Cuervo Jones himself, George Corraface, Special Effects Artist Jim McPherson and Visual Effects Artist David Jones. The Stacy Keach interview is rather short but talks about his relationship with John Carpenter and how he approached his character of Commander Malloy. He does talk about a personal moment on the film that changed his life, but I won’t spoil it. The Bruce Campbell interview is an audio only interview with clips of his performance and stills of the makeup he had to put on for his character. He provides some great insight on his experience doing film which was contrast from Stacy Keach’s experience. The interview does sound dated as he mentions that he recently worked with Kurt Russell again on “Sky High” (which came out in 2005). Peter Jason, George Corraface, Jim McPherson and David Jones have the longest interviews and they all talked about their background, previous jobs and how they joined the project. I have to say the McPherson and Jones interviews were my favorites because they had some great stories on set as well as how they approached their roles.

Kurt Russell and Peter Fonda in “Escape From L.A.”

The biggest disappointment from this Collector’s Edition release is there are no audio commentary tracks for the movie. I love audio commentaries and I put them on during my second viewings of a new release. It would have been great to have John Carpenter reflect on making the film and how he feels about it today. If they couldn’t get Carpenter to do a commentary, they could’ve gone after anyone else from the cast and crew. I’m surprised they didn’t ask any of the interviewees to provide a commentary on their experience and stories.

Once again Shout Factory does an impressive job of bringing a cult classic back to life and in the best format possible. Unlike The Surgeon General of Beverly Hills who botches his patients and requires numerous organ transplants, the facelift of this film is a success. Even if you don’t have a 4K television, you’ll be in awe at its look and the bonus extras and packaging give you the full experience of enjoying Snake Plissken’s next adventure. The Collector’s Edition of “Escape From L.A” is a great addition to their ever-growing library of John Carpenter films.

Horror Fans: Get Ready For A New Terror in “With Child!”

 I previously had the honor of being a contributing writer for “Braindead Network” which was dedicated to all things horror. I’ve met many people in the film industry and have managed to stay in contact with them. One of my contacts forwarded me a new film that they are a part of. Get ready horror fans as “With Child” will bring you the first scares of 2021.

Here is the official press release:

Award winning screenplay, WITH CHILD, announces its cast and begins pre-production.

Recipient of the 2012 ‘Bitch Pack’ award at Shriekfest, WITH CHILD is a supernatural horror thriller, written by Jeff Kacmarynski , whose work is seen in anthologies such as, WELCOME TO HELL and 60 SECONDS TO DIE 2 and the upcoming feature, ESSENCE.

WITH CHILD follows an expecting mother, as she is thrust into a series of increasingly violent confrontations with ghastly children, demanding that she is the mother of death, and she kill her unborn child. Searching for answers, she uncovers a sinister truth about her son, and a terrible truth as to who these children are.

Combining elements of supernatural horror, slasher vibes, a brooding atmosphere, and a dark commentary on destiny and who we are shaped to be, WITH CHILD has assembled an incredible, international cast.

Featuring Laura Wilson (MONSTER , SURPRISE) in the title role of Lily.

Jenn Nangle (MALVOLIA QUEEN OF SCREAMS), Maria Olson (PERCY JACKSON), Sheri Davis (LAKE OF SHADOWS) Julie Anne Prescott (THE LAST ROOMATE) Christian Vaccaro (MURDER PARTY), Thom Mulligan (CALLOUS), Cheryl Prater (ATTACK OF THE UNKNOWN) David McMahon (BONEHILL ROAD) , Aeowyn Sayer (TOLL HOUSE HORRORS), Jessica Cherniak (THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA), Abriella Grace Ruby (THE ANGRY MAN), and Jacob Ault (ESSENCE) join the cast!

Production is tentatively scheduled for January 2021. WITH CHILD is produced by Sub-basement Films, who has produced the upcoming feature, ESSENCE.

I’ll continue to post updates as soon as they come available.

Guilty Pleasure Cinema Returns

Hello everyone! After taking some time off, I’ve decided to bring back “Guilty Pleasure Cinema Review,” but reformat it and change some things. The blog will continue on as “Guilty Pleasure Cinema!” Not only will I be featuring reviews of movies that I can watch over and over again, I’ll be adding newer features such as movie news, retrospectives, Top 10 Lists, etc.

While I have another blog that I maintain and continuing to write screenplays in the hope of selling one, I will maintain “Guilty Pleasure Cinema” and try to keep it updated as much as I can. For the first several weeks of this revival, I will be posting not only new reviews but reviews I’ve done previously. If there’s one you missed out on, you’ll have another chance to revisit it!

Comments/Suggestions/Feedback are very much appreciated and I will respond to your messages in a timely manner!

Thank you to everyone for your continued support! I hope you will enjoy the revamped “Guilty Pleasure Cinema!”

Sincerely,

Adam Cook